Jornal de Distúrbios da Comunicação, Estudos Surdos e Aparelhos Auditivos

Jornal de Distúrbios da Comunicação, Estudos Surdos e Aparelhos Auditivos
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ISSN: 2375-4427

Abstrato

(Central) Auditory Processing Skills in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Mary L Carpenter, Theresa L Estrem, Rebecca L Crowell and Chaturi D Edrisinha

Many studies have shown differences in the way individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) process auditory information when compared to typically developing peers. These include differences in sensitivity to sounds, in electrophysiological responding, and in responding to behavioral tasks that utilize (Central) Auditory Processing ((C)AP) skills. The current study aimed to expand this literature by examining the relationship between ASD and (C)AP across all six associated skills (i.e., localization/lateralization, discrimination, pattern recognition, temporal aspects, performance with competing signals, and performance with degraded signals). The purpose was to determine 1) patterns of responding among a group of individuals with ASD for subtests that address the (C)AP skill areas and 2) the association between (C)AP subtest and composite scores for a group of individuals with ASD and a group of typically developing peers. To achieve this purpose, seven participants between 18 and 21 years of age with ASD and seven age- and gender-matched control participants completed a case history, passed a hearing screening, and participated in assessments measuring (C)AP skills. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used to assess between group differences. Descriptively, patterns of responding were identified for the ASD group, with lower scores in subtests that required dichotic listening. Heterogeneity in responding was also evident. Statistical analysis revealed significant between-group differences for only one subtest, SCAN-3:A Competing Words-Free Recall(F(1,13)=5.21, p<.05). No significant results were identified for other (C)AP subtests or for the composite score. These results extend past research and support findings that suggest some differences in the way individuals with ASD process auditory information compared to typically developing peers. Results warrant further research with a larger sample size, as well as research that addresses the clinical utility of (C)AP testing for individuals with ASD.

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